Becoming Mrs. Smith – Tanya E. Williams

 

“Miss Marshall,” he says. “She’s getting married.”
“Does that mean we’ll have to call her Mrs. Marshall?” Iris asks from across the table.
“No, Iris. She will have to take the last name of her new husband.”
“Huh?” Iris looks dumbfounded.
“Say Violet marries me.” John hesitates and casts me a brief glance. “She would become Mrs. Smith.”” (page 241 – [Amazon Kindle version])

Title: Becoming Mrs. Smith
Written by: Tanya E. Williams
Genre: Historical Romance
Publisher: Rippling Effects
Publication Date: October 5, 2017
Paperback: 109 pages

Violet’s life was almost perfect. She had gone to a good school, she had gotten a respectable job, and John Smith, a boy she grew up with, was showing interest in her as more than just a friend. But when World War Two breaks out John enlists, shattering every dream Violet had. Waiting on the home-front, Violet must keep believing that John will return safe and sound so she can finally become Mrs. Smith.

Okay, so you know how I’ve mentioned (HERE and HERE) my problem with not completely reading book summaries?

Yeah, I did it again.

Can I get professional help for this?

I requested a pre-release copy of the sequel to Becoming Mrs. Smith thinking that the sequel [Stealing Mr. Smith (more info HERE)] was (1.) a standalone novel, and (2.) historical fiction.

*NOTE* I had planned on but will not be doing a review for Stealing Mr. Smith. I have been really stressed lately and had to give up some commitments.*

Well, the series is historical fiction but the main focus is on a love story.

So…yeah.

This is an historical romance book.

*Insert horror movie screaming here*

I don’t read romance.

I avoid romance like a fish avoids air.

That was a really bad metaphor.

Romeo and Juliet is only a good story because they both die in the end.

I was annoyed with myself for (once again) not reading the fine print but I had made a commitment to the author to review her books.

So I read.

*DISCLAIMER: The following is written by a person who thinks Murder on the Orient Express has too much romance.*

Until the end of the book, Becoming Mrs. Smith felt like Little House on the Prairie combined with Sergeant York.

Then the end happened.

Seriously, this was the best ending of a romance novel I have ever read.

And I can’t tell you guys why because of spoilers.

*insert angry book reviewer noises here*

This book ends how I want all romance books to end.

I was literally bubbling with excitement when I finished reading.

I did jumping-jacks.

Seriously, everyone go read this book.

The ending is amazing and the entire book is so beautifully written.

There were times when I found myself lost in the story just because of how gorgeous the writing was.

On the subject of writing:

This book has absolutely NO SWEARING.

Proving (yet again) that you don’t need curse words to have a great book.

I recommend this book to people who like World War Two romance novels or just like romance books in general.

For More Information about the Book and Author Click: HERE

Age Range: 13 – adult

Cautions

Violence: Violet is told about two men who die in a barn fire, and a man who falls off a ladder, breaks his leg, gets an infection, and dies. Violet thinks about John cutting his finger, getting a infection, and dying. A girl commits suicide. Description of labor pain. A woman dies. A woman’s son dies.

Sensuality: Violet rises here nightgown for a doctor. Two characters kiss multiple times, they hold hands, he holds her when she is cold. Girls talk about boys they like.

Profanity: A mention to “personal hell”.

Other(drugs/alcohol): People drink Bourbon. A girl is sick with scarlet fever. A woman dies of a broken heart. Characters are constantly talking about war. Characters fight. Characters lie. Being drunk is mentioned.

Personal rating: 2 1/2 out of 5 stars

Cleanness Rating: 4 1/2 out of 5 stars

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s